5.31.2013

Photo Idol: Melissa Green


I’m always looking for inspiration. Each month I will choose a photographer who really makes me want to be a better photographer.

These beautiful photos were taken by the extremely talented Melissa Green. There is something very real and subtle that she captures in every one of her photos. It is photographers like this that make me really want to strive to be better. You can follow her Instagram , pinterest, facebook and be sure to pay her website a visit. You wont be disappointed. 










5.28.2013

Spray Lakes Reservoir


Notes: We took a little walk around the Spray Lakes Reservoir. There were absolutely no people. It was the perfect temp out for a walk too. Only saw a few ducks and birds.

5.23.2013

Conan The Barbarian



Notes: My brother camera shy doggie. I had to have food or I just got that look in the last picture...

5.20.2013

Be A Better Photographer: Aperture





Part of my journey to become a better photographer is to teach myself starting with the basics. I learnt about photography almost backwards. Learning to edit before really getting into the actual photo taking. Read through my notes and see my practice shots while I try to become a better photographer.

Aperture Settings:

What is it?

The aperture is the opening of the lens diaphragm which lets a certain amount of light into your camera. Aperture is calibrated in f/stops generally between f/16 to f/1.4.



How to set it?

The lower the number in the f/stop (ie. f/1.4) the larger the opening in the lens. A large opening creates less depth of field which will give you a blurrier back and fore ground around your subject. This is referred to as Bokeh. The higher the f/stops (ie. f/16) the smaller the opening in the lens. A small opening will give you less depth of field which will give your back and fore ground a sharper look.


When to adjust it?

Use a low f/stop setting when you would like to achieve a lot of blurriness (bokeh) around your subject such as in portraits. Use a higher f/stop setting when taking a landscape where you want everything in focus.

Hopefully this quick overview of aperture basics will help you be able to control your DSLR a little bit better.

Here is a few more other helpful sites on Aperture. Here and Here.

See more Photography Basics here.

**This is only my conclusion based on my own research and practices. Everyone has their own processes.**

5.16.2013

Canmore, Alberta Part 2





Notes: Still a continuation of our first day around Canmore. Stopped at the River to cool our feet in. It was so hot! We arn't used to this heat!





5.15.2013

Canmore, Alberta Part 1


Notes: Our first walk when we got to Canmore. Just went on the trail around the town.







5.06.2013

Be A Better Photographer: ISO Settings



Part of my journey to become a better photographer is to teach myself starting with the basics. I learnt about photography almost backwards. Learning to edit before really getting into the actual photo taking. Read through my notes and see my practice shots while I try to become a better photographer.

ISO Settings:

What is it?

The ISO sets the amount of light needed for good exposure by calibrating how sensitive the digital image sensor is to the light. It is measured in a simple numeric system usually starting with 100 and (depending on your camera) may go up to 3200.

How to set it?

Every time you double the ISO value (ie. from 200 to 400) the camera needs half as much light to create a well exposed photo. The lower the number you have the less sensitive your digital sensor is; thus requiring a nice bright situation. Likewise, the higher the ISO value the more sensitive your sensor is which means more light will be translated to your photo’s.

When to adjust it?

Use a low ISO setting in nice bright situations like being outdoors. Use a higher ISO when you are indoors or at night.

Warning!
Cranking the ISO will create more noise in your end result. Luckily grainy pictures are all the rage right now!

Hopefully this quick overview of ISO basics will help you be able to control your DSLR a little bit better. Personally, I find I don’t usually have to adjust it very often and prefer to focus more on aperture and shutter speeds (which I will have posts on in the future).

Here is a few more other helpful sites on ISO. Here and Here.

See more Photography Basics here.

**This is only my conclusion based on my own research and practices. Everyone has their own processes.**
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